What I Bring to the Table – Part 2 – One by One

Now things start to get exciting with my table. It is time to make the mortise and tenons.

The first step was to mark out my mortises. I had to stay home one afternoon so Doug sent this home with me for homework. This time I was smart enough to bring measuring instruments home with me so I didn’t have the same problem as last time. He showed me how to do the first one and walked me through the measurements and how to accurately mark my mortise as he drew on one of the legs. When he was finished he erased all he had drawn so I could start fresh.

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Marking my mortises

When I got home I struggled for a moment with my brain to remember the dimensions Doug had so clearly laid out.  Slowly it came back. I started by picking out the worst looking ends (the ends with the most chip out) to be the top, and of those, the two worst sides of each board to be where my mortises would go; that way the most awful looking parts of the legs wouldn’t be seen.  The first one took the longest but once I had my first one marked out the others went quickly.  When I brought them in the next day, Doug said they weren’t perfect but they were good enough.

Next I drew a line down the center of my marked mortises that I would use as a guide to drill out as much as I could. Doug set up the drill press and warned me that the bit he put on wasn’t the best and may not work. He was right. The bit would clog right away and drilling would have taken forever so he put on a new bit. This one wasn’t ideal but at least it would work, however, it was pretty sloppy. No matter how hard I held the board down it would move and and the drill would migrate outside my mortise lines. I felt better that it happened for Doug too. I wasn’t able to drill out as much as I would have liked and that meant I would have to chisel out more by hand later.

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Drilling my mortises

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Chiseling my mortises

Once the drilling was finished it was time to hand chisel out the rest. This was tiring work. I remember making the mortises for the chest I made at Duncan’s and the pine was so easy to cut through, maple is so hard! I used a wooden mallet, mortising chisels made out of really hard steel for the heavy-duty stuff and Japanese chisels for smaller less hardcore work. I whacked and I whacked and I scraped and I scraped and one by one I got my mortises to an approximate finished stage; I would do the finishing touches on them once I had the tenons made.

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Mostly finished mortises

I inspected my work then turned to Doug and said, “I feel like this is the ugliest thing I have ever made.” To which he responded, “Welcome to working with maple.” We then had a discussion on how I felt I was doing and why. I haven’t really done this before so I didn’t really know what I was doing and every time I dug my chisel in I just hoped for the best. Doug kept reassuring me that they were fine mortises but because of that lack of experience and not knowing what I was doing I felt like it was just luck. It’s true that they didn’t look that great and a major reason why is because maple is hard to work with, the grain was convoluted, and the drilling didn’t go that well. But like I said, my mortises turned out all right. I wasn’t really putting myself down; I knew I was a beginner and that the more I do the more comfortable, confident, and knowledgeable I will become. If I keep going I won’t be able to pin it on luck, I’ll have experience and understanding to back me up.

I set my mortise joints aside and went to work on the table top for a break. My first task was to figure out which board I wanted where. This board here, that board there, flip them over, rearrange them, put them back. I tried every possible combination a couple of times before deciding on one of my earliest combinations – it always seems to work like that. Then I marked the boards so I could easily line them up later when gluing or if they got moved around.

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Ready to glue up the table top

Then it was time to do a dry fit to make sure everything would fit tight and flush. I lined my boards up and clamped them tight together. Good thing for the dry run, a couple of the edges weren’t completely flat and I had to run them through the jointer. Then I did another dry fit, this time they were perfect. Doug had something he needed to get done so he said if I was feeling brave I could attempt to do the glue up alone. I accepted the challenge and gathered the needed supplies. I had the clamps set up, the boards positioned, and the glue in hand, I was ready. On your marks, get set, GO! As fast as I could I squeezed and slathered glue on each edge, laid the boards flat, and matched them up. Then I put the final clamp on top and cranked them tight. The glue was slippery and the boards kept moving out of place. I would move them back into place and crank the clamps a little tighter only to have them move again. I just kept realigning them and cranking a little tighter until they were finally together. I used far more glue than I needed and it oozed and dripped from the joints. I grabbed a piece of paper and attempted to scrape all the excess off. Pretty soon I was covered in glue too. After I wiped my hands clean Doug came over to look at how I did. He congratulated me saying it was no easy feat to do glue up job alone.

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Tabletop glued and clamped

Slowly and steadily I’m working my way towards a complete table, though I still have quite a ways to go. My days are also split between working on my table and helping Doug. All in all things are going well and I’m excited!

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