Never Ending

Last week! This is my very last week of internships for school. I have completed 4 months of fine woodworking and furniture making. It will be nice to have a break but at the same time I will miss woodworking. I’m know this is not the end for me, but I will be going back to regular classes and between them and my family I won’t have that much spare time until after I graduate. I guess there is always summer vacation and weekends.

For the first part of my last week I helped Duncan resize a bed frame. He had made a cherry bed frame 20 years ago for an older couple that he is friends with. Due to the declining health of the wife, they are moving into an assisted living facility. Their new bedroom is a little smaller than their current one so Duncan offered to turn their king sized bed frame into a queen.

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Drilled hole then squared one side to bolt mortise and tenon together

I helped Duncan pick the bed frame up from their house. We took out all the bolts and pulled the pieces apart and loaded it into Duncan’s small pickup truck. The next day Duncan cut a bit off each side and I helped knock the glued mortise and tenons apart with a hammer whacking, like a mad woman, one side than the other. Then I cleaned out the excess glue left in the mortises. Duncan redid the tenons then I redrilled the holes that the bolts go in that attach the tenons to the mortises and used a hammer and chisel to square one side. The next time I came in Duncan had everything finished and glued back together. We then brought it to the couples new apartment and reassembled it.

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King sized bed frame made into a queen size

With only a few days left Duncan suggested I could make another box. The first time I made a box with Duncan it took me almost a month, now I had less than a week. I had promised my son that I would make him a toy box so I took this opportunity to do so. He dug through his wood and pulled out a long 1×12 of pine. We figured out the max size the box could be; it would be just a little smaller than the first one I made.

I cut the pieces to size then surfaced all the sides. Next, using a router jig, I made box joints. Then I hand planed all the sides and made a dado grooves on the bottom inside of each where the bottom would fit. I cut a piece of thin plywood for the bottom and sanded it. Then I glued everything together. Now I had the carcass of my box. I quickly decided that I wanted a small trim around the bottom. I cut the boards, glued them around the bottom, and clamped them.

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Router jig for making box joints

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Routed box joints

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Basic box glued up

Next it was time to think about what I wanted to do for the top. Duncan suggested I could either make a lid that would lift on and off or I could put a hinge on it like I did before. I though about it for a bit before deciding that a hinge would be better, that way my son wouldn’t take the lid off and drag it around the house. So the next morning before going in I stopped by the local hardware store and picked up some little brass hinges. When I got in I measured and marked where the hinges would go and used a chisel to make a little nook in the box where they would fit. Then I screwed the hinges on and marked and screwed them onto the lid.

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First coat of oil drying on my finished box

The last step was to oil it. I put on two coats over two days. And it was done. It went a lot faster the second time around regardless of it being a lot simpler than the first box I made. I knew the steps to follow and how to make a basic box for the most part. I still had to ask Duncan questions now and then and I still made a few mistakes but all in all it went really smoothly. And I must say, I really like making boxes; maybe I will become a box maker.

I had a really wonderful time working with Duncan. The atmosphere is very relaxed and the conversation is very meaningful. I am so lucky to have had the opportunity to work with him and to have an open invitation to come back any time. I know it’s the end for now, but not the end forever. I learned a lot during my time with him by working with my own hands, watching him work, and talking with him. I can’t wait to see what I make of all this knowledge and what I will end up building over the course of my life.

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